Tahoe Rim Trail 50M 2014

Ultra running is like childbirth. You prepare for months. When you’re in the middle of it you think it’s painful and never to be done again. But as soon as it’s over, you only remember the good. You start to think maybe there will be a next time.

The 2014 Tahoe Rim Trail 50-miler had everything. Beautiful views. Best in the business aid stations. Climbs. Rocks. Altitude. Altitude sickness. Thunder and lightening.

We did remarkably well and not so great.

On the remarkably well side, neither of us really got tired. In fact, our legs were fine all the way until the end. We enjoyed ourselves. Took photos. Appreciated the views. Talked to the volunteers. Chatted with other runners. Plowed through the thunder and lightening. It was quite a remarkable day.

On the not so great side, I got sick. For about 30 miles. Which sucked. It’s never happened to me before. But this time I was hit with altitude sickness. It was like being car sick while running. Often, I couldn’t run at all. I wanted to just throw up.

I vowed never to run there again. I gave thanks for picking Eastern States 100 (at sea level) over Leadville (at high altitude). For about five minutes, I thought about dropping out.  I think we lost about an hour because of my stomach.

But now, a few days later, it’s all good. I think I’ll probably do it again.

More importantly, I got to run the whole thing with Scott. It was his first 50-miler. And he was amazing. Such a strong runner. Such a great partner. I felt badly that I held him back. That he had to take care of me and not the other way around. He ran behind me, otherwise he would have inadvertently left without me.

After 14 hours and change, we crossed that finish line together. 1000 miles of training that traversed over 100,000 ft of climbing. We did it all together. Beginning to end.

So our time wasn’t great (half hour off what I did last time) but it wasn’t horrible. We were middle of the pack. And like Luis Escobar says, “It’s ultra running. Nobody cares about your time.”

Two days later Scott sent me a link to another 50M. Like childbirth, we’ve forgotten the bad and are only thinking about the good.

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Checking in the day before. It’s getting real.
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Bags dropped…
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Everything’s ready…
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3:30AM wake up call. Getting everything ready before we hit the bus to the start line.
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We found our great friend and incredible runner, Kim Moyano, at the start. Kim can’t stay away from a start line, even if she isn’t running.
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Thinking about what’s to come. About 20 minutes before 6:00AM start.
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Start of the 50-miler. Photo courtesy of the Tahoe Rim Trail team.
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Passing Marlett Lake.
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Made it to Hobart Aid Station. It had a circus theme, complete with a bar, bacon, and clowns.
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Volunteers making the runners breakfast at Hobart Aid Station. Mile 6.3.
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Why not?
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About mile 9 I think. Lake Tahoe is the big one in the background.

 

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Made it to the lowest point on the course, the Red House, about 6000′ in elevation. Everywhere we go we try to take photos of Scott with a dog. It’s just a thing we do.
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Hustle and bustle of Tunnel Creek Aid Station. We hit this one 3 times. They call it “The City of Tunnel Creek” because of all the non-stop activity.
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That’s a good team right there.
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We saw views like this all day. It’s the most beautiful run I’ve ever done.
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Starting the infamous Diamond Peak climb. It’s a black diamond ski run that we have to climb up. It takes 1 hour to go 2 miles. Runners go about 50 feet and then stop to catch their breath. Many just sit on the side of the trail for this one.
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Scott making his way up Diamond Peak. He’s getting close to the top.

 

 

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I don’t really know where this is on the course. I just like the photo.
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That’s a wrap! Photo courtesy of Tahoe Rim Trail team.
And scene!
And scene!

p.s.

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This is my back the next day. All the abrasions are from my Perpetuem solids! It never occurred to me that over 14 hours of carrying those small nuggets of solid nutrition in my pack would beat up my back so much. Lesson learned. Better to realize it now than during the 100 miler.

 

 

 

 

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. Jason says:

    Awesome job! And great pictures! I’d definitely like to do that one someday.

  2. ssk109 says:

    I feel appreciated. And famous! Thank you!!

  3. julianneruns says:

    We had over 100 views in two days. You should feel famous. I love you. 🙂

  4. julianneruns says:

    Hi Jason. Thank you! You should do it one day. It’s amazing.

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